Gynaecology

Excellence in women’s health

At Women’s Health Specialists, we provide specialist, patient-centred gynaecological care for women at all stages of their life. 

We understand that gynaecological issues can have a significant impact on your life, which is why we offer a caring and supportive environment to discuss your health and explore optimum treatment options. 

We can help with a wide range of gynaecological issues, including:

  • Paediatric and adolescent gynaecology
  • Endometriosis
  • Pelvic pain
  • Cervical screening tests and colposcopy
  • Menstrual issues
  • Ovarian cysts
  • Contraception and family planning
  • Miscarriages
  • Ectopic pregnancies
  • Pelvic organ prolapse
  • Menopause
  • Urinary incontinence
  • Minimally invasive surgery for hysterectomies, ovarian cysts or endometriosis

We operate at Calvary North Adelaide Hospital, Ashford Hospital and at the Women’s and Children’s Hospital for self-funded private patients.

Contact us on (08) 8239 2811 to book your appointment.

This depends on the type of closure method and dressing applied to your wound. There are two possible methods used for either laparoscopic or open wounds:

  • Skin glue is a water-proof adhesive that will hold the skin together while it heals. You will not need a dressing over the top and can shower like normal. The glue will come off on its own over the first 1-2 weeks.
  • Dissolvable stitches are under the skin which do not need removing. You will have a dressing over the wound which can go in the shower and then pat dry afterwards. You can remove the dressings after 5 days and leave the wounds open.

You will be given instructions specific to you when you are discharged from the hospital. However common pain tablets prescribed include:

  • Paracetamol: 1g (2 tablets) every 4-6 hours (do not take more than 8 tablets in a 24-hour period). Taking paracetamol regularly can decrease your need for stronger medications.
  • Anti-inflammatory drugs (eg. Voltaren, Nurofen, Advil, Ibuprofen): follow the dosing directions on the packet and ensure you take them with food to prevent stomach upset. Taking anti-inflammatory tablets regularly can decrease your need for stronger medications. These can be taken in at the same time as paracetamol.
  • Oxycodone: directions for the appropriate dose for you will be on the box. This is a strong pain medication and should be only used as long as severe pain persists. Once the pain improves, oxycodone should be the first medication to stop.
  • Tramadol: this may be prescribed instead of oxycodone with the appropriate dose on the box. This is a strong pain medication and should be only used as long as severe pain persists. Once the pain improves, tramadol should be the first medication to stop.

Day surgery (minor procedures):

  • You should not drive for 24 hours after having a general anaesthetic.
  • You can resume driving when you are comfortable, not in pain and not requiring strong pain relief (ie. oxycodone or tramadol).
Laparoscopic surgery (keyhole surgery):
  • You can generally begin driving within 1-2 weeks of your surgery, however if you have had a laparoscopic hysterectomy it may take 2-4 weeks before you can drive.
  • You can resume driving when you are comfortable, not in pain and not requiring strong pain relief (ie. oxycodone or tramadol).
Open surgery (caesarean type cut or up and down cut on the abdomen):
  • It may take 4-6 weeks before you are able to drive.
  • You can resume driving when you are able to comfortably move your feet between the pedals and perform and emergency break. You should also not be taking strong pain relief (ie. oxycodone or tramadol).

Lifting:

  • You should be careful lifting heavy objects. If you lift something and feel pain in your abdomen, then it is too heavy.
  • If you have had a hysterectomy or a prolapse repair then you should avoid lifting anything heavier than 5kg for at least 6 weeks after your surgery, preferably 12 weeks. This will improve the outcome of your surgery.
  • You should organise for family or friends to assist with house hold chores and shopping during your recovery.
Moving around and exercise:
  • You will be tired when you go home but it is important that you move around every day. Initially you can take short walks around your house, building up to longer walks over the next days to weeks.
  • The timing for returning to strenuous activity or exercise will vary depending on your surgery, we can give you advice specific to you when you are discharged from the hospital.

You should monitor your wounds for signs of infection:

  • Redness around the wound
  • Surrounding skin becoming hot
  • Discharge from the wound
  • Worsening pain around the wound
If there is a minor infection, you can clean the wound with betadine twice daily and apply a new dressing. If there are ongoing symptoms or you are concerned please contact us for further advice.

Constipation is common after surgery and may be made worse due to the strong pain medications such as oxycodone or tramadol. Make sure you maintain good hydration with water and dietary changes with increased fibre diet, fruits or prunes. Multiple over the counter medications are available from the pharmacy:

  • Coloxyl and senna 1-2 tablets twice a day
  • Lactulose 30ml up to 3 times a day
  • Microlax enema following the instruction of the packet
If your constipation persists please contact us for further advice.

Minor surgery or laparoscopy:

  • It is common to have a small amount of bleeding after a minor vaginal procedure (such as a hysteroscopy or a curette) or a laparoscopy which may last for about a week.
  • You should avoid using tampons, going swimming or having intercourse for a week after the surgery.
Hysterectomy:
  • It is normal to have light vaginal bleeding after a hysterectomy, lasting for 2-4 weeks.
  • You should avoid using tampons, going swimming or having intercourse for 6 weeks after the surgery.
  • If you have heavy bleeding or there is bad smelling discharge, please contact us for further advice.

  • Cramping or period type pain may last for a few days after having an IUD inserted. This can be treated with a combination of paracetamol and anti-inflammatory medications.
  • Persistent bleeding or intermittent spotting bleeding can last a few weeks or even a few months in some cases.
If you experience worsening abdominal pain, fevers or bad smelling vaginal discharge in the days/weeks following insertion of your IUD, please contact us for further advice.

The information provided is of a general nature and should not replace a full medical assessment. If you require further detailed information, please contact us